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Sleep Apnea Therapy

The Positive Airway Pressure (PAP) therapy is one of the most effective, non-invasive treatments available today for OSA.

What is PAP Therapy?

The Positive Airway Pressure (PAP) therapy is one of the most effective, non-invasive treatments available today for OSA. The machine gently blows air into the nose and / mouth  through a tubing to a face mask to prevent airway from collapsing during sleep. There are several types of sleep therapy machines and masks available.

 

CPAP Therapy

The CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) machine is the most common. It sends a constant flow of airway pressure to your throat to ensure that your airway stays open during sleep, effectively treating the spontaneous pauses in breath associated with sleep apnea.

 

BiPAP Therapy

The BiPAP (Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure) machine delivers two different positive pressure levels. It keeps the upper airway from collapsing by delivering higher pressurized air during inspiration and helps users exhale easier by delivering lower pressurized air. BiPAP devices are sometimes prescribed for patients who have trouble tolerating one constant pressure from a CPAP machine.

 

Mask selection for PAP Therapy

It is important to choose a CPAP face mask that effectively treats the sleep apnea condition while maximizing the comfort level. The considerations of an ideal fit includes determining the needs of the user such as how they breathe or position during sleep.

Benefits of PAP Therapy

Treatment of sleep apnea will positively impact the patient’s life.

Some of the benefits of treatment1 include:

  • Increased energy level and attentiveness during the day
  • Fewer morning headaches
  • Reduced irritability
  • Improved memory
  • Less waking during the night to go to the bathroom
  • Increased ability to exercise
  • Improved overall quality of life

The key to realising these benefits is to stay committed to the treatment every single night for at least 4 hrs per night.

 

Reference:

New York Times “Sleep Apnea In-Depth Report” citing various references, http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/sleep-apnea/print.html